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Author Topic: Why spend time complaining about poetry?  (Read 10949 times)
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bluetrain1208
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« on: July 09, 2006, 10:32:46 PM »

Not for nothin'--but why, if you guys all find contemporary poetry so repulsive and irrelevant--do you keep writing long posts about it? Couldn't you turn your energy to something else like, I don't know, Indian cooking or pottery or at least posting on sties where you can talk about how much Indian cooing and pottery suck?
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Matt
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2006, 09:03:21 AM »

Quote from: "bluetrain1208"
Not for nothin'--but why, if you guys all find contemporary poetry so repulsive and irrelevant--do you keep writing long posts about it? Couldn't you turn your energy to something else like, I don't know, Indian cooking or pottery or at least posting on sties where you can talk about how much Indian cooing and pottery suck?


So, we should ignore everything that we don't worship blindly?

I would think it obvious that we love poetry enough to spend as much time with it as we do.  If we didn't love it we wouldn't want to criticize, challenge, and question it . . . we wouldn't care if it was healed or improved.

Admiring and accepting contemporary poetry with little or no critical intelligence on board seems a much more radical dismissal of that poetry's real literary worth than an insistence that that poetry be meaningful or useful or cultural (rather than cultic).

-Matt
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Funk not only moves, it can RE-move, dig?"
      --Sir Lollipop Man (Alias, the Long-Haired Sucker)
Bugzita
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2006, 05:18:51 PM »

In the July/August issue of Poets & Writers, Reagan Upshaw, in his article "Verse to Last," says,

Quote
The vast majority of [poets] will not be classed by posterity as great poets. But every serious poet, whether he will admit to it or not, wants, in Robert Frost's words, to lodge a few poems where they can't be gotten rid of easily.


Perhaps we have to read through a lot of chaff to get to the good stuff.

Bugz
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ennifer Semple Siegel

One must always question wrongheaded conventional wisdom.
jimmy
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2006, 09:07:40 PM »

I do think pottery sucks.

xxxjimmy
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Wilson
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2006, 12:00:48 PM »

I have seen similar suggestions regarding the Bush administration and  certain reporters from certain newspapers.

Wonder what Brittany Spears is doing?  Or Simon Cowell?  Guess I had best check out the front page of the USA Today.

Completely retarded.
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his is the abyss--quit staring!

Wils
bluetrain1208
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« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2006, 09:32:45 PM »

I've been checking into this forum for a whiel now and have yet to see most of you claim to admire any poet, never mind individual poem. And certainly I've rarely seen a living poet given any regard at all. Just seems like a waste of an awful lot of energy, especially since some of you reguarly type up posts that run longer than some of the research papers I get.

Please understand, typing stuff on the internet about how much you hate poetry and poets is one of the more innocuous ways you could spend your time. I was jsut curious, that's all.
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Wilson
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2006, 12:33:34 PM »

Could it be blue, you have missed the thread on underated poets?  Or some of the other threads all over this site where someone states who they like and why?  Say it aint so, Joe!

I will say it again for everyone: read more than you write.   ...a lot more.
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his is the abyss--quit staring!

Wils
alan
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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2006, 02:53:56 PM »

Blue is waiting for someone to say Al Maginnes is their favorite poet.
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Wilson
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« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2006, 05:16:09 PM »

Blue may turn blue holding his breath for that one.
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Wils
adamhardin
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« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2006, 03:39:54 AM »

Blue train is a sad train. But blue train is an angry train because blue train runs on steam. "I am an angry angry train. The Olive Garden has great food. I am a train and I know authentic Italian food. Why won't you make me a happy train and eat at the Olive Garden? Why won't you partake of the breadsticks and salad and soup special? I will grate some cheese for your salad. Most of our food is authentically pre-cooked, frozen, and then reheated. Our sauce is made from the best tomato paste and water on Earth. Please enjoy some authentic Italian music sung by Sinatra while you eat. "Fly Me to the Moon," is a classic in Venice. Make me a happy train and come to the Olive Garden."
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arold Bloom's accountant does not know how Harold managed to effortlessly transition their discussion of annuities to Falstaff but he suspects a similar ploy was used to sexually harrass Naomi Wolf.
papa_geno
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« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2006, 04:48:35 AM »

I'm with Frost and Bugz...

Quote
But every serious poet, whether he will admit to it or not, wants, in Robert Frost's words, to lodge a few poems where they can't be gotten rid of easily.


...but where is that place, exactly? In THE established canon?

Most days, I'm good with having touched a potential lover's heart--that's as good a place for a poem to lodge as any I can think of. But hey, I aim low, and hope for the best. I understand it worked against Achilles, so who knows?
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Bugzita
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« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2006, 12:52:41 PM »

papa_geno says,

Quote
I'm with Frost and Bugz...

Quote
But every serious poet, whether he will admit to it or not, wants, in Robert Frost's words, to lodge a few poems where they can't be gotten rid of easily.


...but where is that place, exactly? In THE established canon?

Most days, I'm good with having touched a potential lover's heart--that's as good a place for a poem to lodge as any I can think of. But hey, I aim low, and hope for the best. I understand it worked against Achilles, so who knows?


A lot of enduring poets/writers have to reach old age or even die before they are "realized." Very few are lucky enough to reach that status as young or even middle-aged poets.

Being published by friends can take a writer only so far; once the the crony editors die off, the work has to stand on its own merit. Most of what is published today will not.

I don't know that the canon is really "established." Go to NCTE and MLA (among other conferences), and you will see bitter debates as to what constitutes "The Canon."

My point: The Canon is a fluid concept.

So, papa_geno, just write your poetry and maybe post some of the best  on your own website. The internet, I suspect, will it change how we decide the future canon (whatever THAT means).

Cheers!

Bugz
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ennifer Semple Siegel

One must always question wrongheaded conventional wisdom.
papa_geno
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« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2006, 01:27:27 PM »

Bugz,

Guess I'm good with that, except that I do not publish my own work on my zine (though I do work on a lot of in-house material, almost all of which gets published under a name other than my poetry...and I do have some poems on the net, for what it's worth) IF the internet is to change the way things get published--and I think it already has--that's one practice zines are really better off without.

Re: the established canon: I'm passingly aware of these controversies, so yeah, a little tongue in cheek on that front.

I like what Donald Hall says in his essay Death to the Death of Poetry:

"Poetry was always in good shape twenty or thirty years ago; now it has always gone to hell."

Does it for me, anyway.
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Bugzita
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« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2006, 01:44:19 PM »

I wonder how much of the poetry published twenty, thirty, forty years ago is even on the current literary radar? Who has emerged from that time? Better yet, who was touted as "the next big thing" 100 years ago and is still known today?

The collective memory seems to fade, remembering only those poets and writers who have endured, which is why Donald Hall's quote is so true.

Bugz
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ennifer Semple Siegel

One must always question wrongheaded conventional wisdom.
Wilson
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« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2006, 11:30:09 AM »

PG,

I think you might have that mixed up a bit.  Aiming low did not work for Achilles, it worked for Paris.
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his is the abyss--quit staring!

Wils
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